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Postpartum Recovery

The Origin Way

What do you get?

Treat & prevent symptoms

Heal from childbirth, prevent pain, and rebuild your abs & pelvic floor.

Feel like your best self again

Defy "mom body" stereotypes by feeling stronger than ever.

Get back to activities you love

From exercise to sex to returning to work, move with total confidence.

Common & Treatable

Postpartum FAQ

When can I return to exercise after a vaginal delivery?

Your OBGYN will likely clear you for return to exercise at your 6 week postpartum check-up. However, once cleared, the return should be gradual and should factor in your pregnancy and birth experience, your current level of activity, the exercise type, your goals, and your pelvic floor's response to activity.

When can I return to exercise after a c-section?

Your OBGYN will likely clear you for return to exercise at your 6-8 week postpartum check-up once the incision has fully closed. However, once cleared, the return should be gradual and should factor in your pregnancy and birth experience, your level of activity, the exercise type, and your core and pelvic floor's response to activity.

How can PT help me rebuild my pelvic floor postpartum?

The pelvic floor works to support your pelvic joints and organs and to prevent leaking gas, urine or stool. Pregnancy and childbirth can lead to changes in these muscles. Pelvic floor physical therapists are experts at assessing your pelvic floor function and providing tools, guidance and exercises to help you restore their ability to work.

Why do I feel pressure in my pelvis postpartum?

Immediately postpartum, you may experience pelvic pressure related to swelling, hemorrhoids or tissue healing, especially if you received an episiotomy or tore during delivery. Once these wounds have closed, pressure or heaviness may be linked to various issues including pelvic floor dysfunction, vulvar varicosities, or pelvic organ prolapse.

How long will it take to recover from a c-section?

Wound healing following a c-section typically takes from 6-8 weeks. However, recovery has to do with more than simply wound closure. If your core and pelvic floor need strengthening, if your posture has suffered, if your incision causes you pain or discomfort, and if you are sleep deprived with caring for a baby, these factors can all impact your recovery.

How can PT help with c-section recovery?

Physical therapy following a c-section is there to help you rebuild your core and pelvic floor muscles' strength and endurance, to improve your scar tissue's flexibility and decrease sensitivity, and to provide guidance for good body mechanics during childcare tasks that will reduce your risk of injury and promote healing.

What is c-section scar massage?

C-section scar massage is a hands-on technique used by physical therapists to reduce your scar's sensitivity and improve its flexibility. Depending on your phase of healing, whether you are 1 day or 1 year postpartum, your physical therapist will guide you through the most appropriate massage strategy for your c-section scar.

When can I start bending after a c-section?

You’ll want to avoid deep bending, lifting more than your baby, or otherwise stretching or straining your abs until your incision is fully healed around 4-8 weeks after delivery. While your c-section is healing, remember to bend at the knees and waist and try to keep your back tall in order to protect the incision. Try to avoid movement or activity that causes pain at the scar site.

What is postpartum diastasis recti?

Diastasis recti or DRA is the separation of the "six-pack" muscles and the stretching of the connective tissue between them in order to make space for a growing abdomen. This separation is considered normal in pregnancy and should resolve within 6 weeks postpartum. If the muscles remain separated or the connective tissue remains lax beyond 6 weeks, this is considered a postpartum diastasis.

How can I tell if I have diastasis recti?

The most obvious sign of a diastasis recti is "coning" or "doming." Coning is seen in the space between your six pack muscles typically between the sternum and belly button when doing a crunch-like movement. The increased pressure in the abdomen caused by crunching pushes against the over-stretched connective tissue making it bulge outwards.

Physical therapists standing and smiling together after an Origin even

The Origin Team

Our pelvic floor and orthopedic physical therapists have helped over 15,000 patients feel better in their bodies.

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Vaginal & C-Section Birth Recovery
Vaginal & C-Section Birth Recovery
Virtual Care for Busy Moms
Heal & strengthen right from home. Yes, your baby can crash your Zoom call.
The #1 Pelvic Floor PT Platform

Feel-Good Care for Your Fourth Trimester

Every postpartum body deserves expert care. Meet with your PT in-person or virtually, restore strength & balance, and get the support you need to feel your best.

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What do you get?

Treat & prevent symptoms

Treat & Prevent Symptoms

Heal from childbirth, prevent pain, and rebuild your abs & pelvic floor.

Feel like your best self again

Feel Like Your Best Self Again

Defy "mom body" stereotypes by feeling stronger than ever.

Get back to activities you love

Get Back To Activities You Love

From exercise to sex to returning to work, move with total confidence.

Covered by Insurance

Postpartum recovery shouldn’t break the bank. Learn more here.

Trusted by Doctors, Loved by New Moms

Origin provides OBGYN-recommended pelvic & whole body physical therapy that’s evidence-based and personalized to meet your needs.

100%
of OBGYNs recommend pelvic floor physical therapy postpartum
89%
of postpartum patients saw improvement in symptoms
90%
of postpartum patients recommend Origin to new moms

Expert care & support

  • 6 visits with a pelvic floor physical therapist
  • Personalized exercise program, updated weekly
  • Educational resources prescribed for you
  • Tracking tools to keep you motivated
  • Opportunities to connect with & support other moms

Full-body recovery

  • Evaluate your symptoms
  • Heal perineal tears
  • Care for your Cesarean scar
  • Stop bladder leaks
  • Heal diastasis recti
  • Relieve pelvic pain / pain with sex
  • Improve bowel function
  • Alleviate mastitis / clogged milk ducts
  • Treat and prevent low back pain
  • Support your body for better sleep
  • Prevent injury while caring for baby
  • Return safely to exercise

What Our Patients Say About Origin

Stephanie S.
"I found Origin when I was pregnant. After having my baby, I came back to do pelvic floor work. It's been a godsend!"
Stephanie S.
Separated Abs, Pregnancy
Sophie S.
"After my c-section, I was experiencing core weakness, SI joint and hip pain, and tightness in my scar. My PT was incredible to work with and helped me meet my goals."
Sophie S.
Postpartum, C-Section Recovery
F.C.
"I'm from France, where pelvic floor care is considered crucial post-delivery, and I was so happy when I found Origin. The team is knowledgeable, professional, and thoughtful in their medical approach."
F.C.
Postpartum
Jennifer S.
"I've learned great exercises and adjustments for daily movements to reduce strain and pain. I've been delighted by how effective the virtual visits are."
Jennifer S.
Low Back Pain

As seen in

WSJ
The Cut
Tech Crunch
The New York Times
Today
Vogue
Postpartum recovery doesn't "just happen." Restore your body with physical therapy.

Postpartum recovery doesn't "just happen." Restore your body with physical therapy.

Schedule Now

Postpartum FAQ

When can I return to exercise after a vaginal delivery?

Your OBGYN will likely clear you for return to exercise at your 6 week postpartum check-up. However, once cleared, the return should be gradual and should factor in your pregnancy and birth experience, your current level of activity, the exercise type, your goals, and your pelvic floor's response to activity.

When can I return to exercise after a c-section?

Your OBGYN will likely clear you for return to exercise at your 6-8 week postpartum check-up once the incision has fully closed. However, once cleared, the return should be gradual and should factor in your pregnancy and birth experience, your level of activity, the exercise type, and your core and pelvic floor's response to activity.

How can PT help me rebuild my pelvic floor postpartum?

The pelvic floor works to support your pelvic joints and organs and to prevent leaking gas, urine or stool. Pregnancy and childbirth can lead to changes in these muscles. Pelvic floor physical therapists are experts at assessing your pelvic floor function and providing tools, guidance and exercises to help you restore their ability to work.

Why do I feel pressure in my pelvis postpartum?

Immediately postpartum, you may experience pelvic pressure related to swelling, hemorrhoids or tissue healing, especially if you received an episiotomy or tore during delivery. Once these wounds have closed, pressure or heaviness may be linked to various issues including pelvic floor dysfunction, vulvar varicosities, or pelvic organ prolapse.

How long will it take to recover from a c-section?

Wound healing following a c-section typically takes from 6-8 weeks. However, recovery has to do with more than simply wound closure. If your core and pelvic floor need strengthening, if your posture has suffered, if your incision causes you pain or discomfort, and if you are sleep deprived with caring for a baby, these factors can all impact your recovery.

How can PT help with c-section recovery?

Physical therapy following a c-section is there to help you rebuild your core and pelvic floor muscles' strength and endurance, to improve your scar tissue's flexibility and decrease sensitivity, and to provide guidance for good body mechanics during childcare tasks that will reduce your risk of injury and promote healing.

What is c-section scar massage?

C-section scar massage is a hands-on technique used by physical therapists to reduce your scar's sensitivity and improve its flexibility. Depending on your phase of healing, whether you are 1 day or 1 year postpartum, your physical therapist will guide you through the most appropriate massage strategy for your c-section scar.

When can I start bending after a c-section?

You’ll want to avoid deep bending, lifting more than your baby, or otherwise stretching or straining your abs until your incision is fully healed around 4-8 weeks after delivery. While your c-section is healing, remember to bend at the knees and waist and try to keep your back tall in order to protect the incision. Try to avoid movement or activity that causes pain at the scar site.

What is postpartum diastasis recti?

Diastasis recti or DRA is the separation of the "six-pack" muscles and the stretching of the connective tissue between them in order to make space for a growing abdomen. This separation is considered normal in pregnancy and should resolve within 6 weeks postpartum. If the muscles remain separated or the connective tissue remains lax beyond 6 weeks, this is considered a postpartum diastasis.

How can I tell if I have diastasis recti?

The most obvious sign of a diastasis recti is "coning" or "doming." Coning is seen in the space between your six pack muscles typically between the sternum and belly button when doing a crunch-like movement. The increased pressure in the abdomen caused by crunching pushes against the over-stretched connective tissue making it bulge outwards.

There's More to Share!

6 Causes of Painful Sex After a C-Section or Vaginal Birth

5 Postpartum Belly Exercises to Start Right Away

How to Care for Your Baby Without Hurting Your Back

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