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Improving Incontinence

What’s Happening In Your Body

What’s Happening In Your Body

Your pelvic floor muscles are responsible for supporting your bowels and bladder and controlling the sphincters that hold in poop and pee (hey, someone has to do it). Incontinence is a signal that these muscles lack strength and/or coordination.

Work 1:1 With A Physical Therapist

Work 1:1 With A Physical Therapist

Your PT will help you restore strength to your pelvic floor, so leaks happen less often (or stop altogether). Treatment may include:

  • Techniques for connecting with your pelvic floor
  • Manual pelvic floor therapy
  • Strength & coordination exercises
  • Vaginal weights — yes, your vagina can lift weights
Power Up Your Pelvic Floor

Power Up Your Pelvic Floor

On average, treatment takes 12 weekly visits, but you may notice results much sooner as you relearn how to effectively coordinate, contract, and release your pelvic floor.

Covered by Insurance

Postpartum recovery shouldn’t break the bank.

We’re in-network with most insurance plans.

Learn more here.

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What our patients say about Origin

Stephanie S.
"I found Origin when I was pregnant. After having my baby, I came back to do pelvic floor work. It's been a godsend!"
Stephanie S.
Separated Abs, Pregnancy
Sophie S.
"After my c-section, I was experiencing core weakness, SI joint and hip pain, and tightness in my scar. My PT was incredible to work with and helped me meet my goals."
Sophie S.
Postpartum, C-Section Recovery
 F.C.
"I'm from France, where pelvic floor care is considered crucial post-delivery, and I was so happy when I found Origin. The team is knowledgeable, professional, and thoughtful in their medical approach."
F.C.
Postpartum
Jennifer S.
"I've learned great exercises and adjustments for daily movements to reduce strain and pain. I've been delighted by how effective the virtual visits are."
Jennifer S.
Low Back Pain

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Incontinence FAQs

What is incontinence?

Incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, gas, or stool, often associated with sneezing, laughing, exercise, or the inability to make it to the bathroom in time. Whether you completely pee your pants or just leak a few drops while laughing with a full bladder, any amount of leaking is considered incontinence.

What are the different types of incontinence?

Stress incontinence (SUI) or urge incontinence (UUI) are both involuntary losses of urine. In the case of SUI, this can occur with activity like coughing, sneezing, or jumping. UUI occurs when an urge to pee occurs and you leak before making it to the bathroom. If you experience both SUI and UUI , it is called mixed incontinence. Fecal incontinence is related to involuntary loss of stool.

What are the symptoms of incontinence?

Symptoms can range from leaking drops to complete bladder emptying. Once a person experiences incontinence, this can cause them to use the bathroom much more frequently in order to avoid future accidents. Over time this can lead to changes in your voiding strategies and habits that can further impact your quality of life.

What causes incontinence?

Incontinence can occur following events like surgery, weight gain or childbirth. While many factors can be involved, incontinence is most commonly related to pelvic floor dysfunction. It can be a coordination issue, meaning your body is unable to time a contraction correctly, or a strength issue, meaning you don't have the muscle ability to prevent or delay voiding.

Why is incontinence so common during pregnancy and postpartum?

In pregnancy, increased weight gain makes the ability to contract your pelvic floor muscles quickly or with adequate strength more challenging. At the same time, your growing baby puts pressure on your bladder, which increases your body's urge to pee. During a vaginal birth, the pelvic floor muscles can experience trauma that will increase incontinence postpartum.

How long does it take to stop incontinence?

Working with a physical therapist who specializes in treating the pelvic floor has been proven effective in reducing and curing incontinence. Those who attend regular physical therapy sessions can see results within weeks to months, depending on the cause, type and severity of their incontinence, as well as the person's individual goals, like return to running.

Bladder And Bowel Control

Bladder & Bowel Control

Peeing when you sneeze or cough, releasing a blast of air in downward dog, stressing when you’re anywhere without a bathroom… You don’t have to put up with a leaky bladder or bowels for the rest of your life — and spend a fortune on absorbent underwear — just because you’ve been pregnant or are past a certain age.

A PT can help you regain control by treating pelvic floor dysfunction that leads to incontinence. We even offer virtual visits so you can skip the commute.

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The Origin Way

Improving Incontinence

What’s Happening In Your Body

Your pelvic floor muscles are responsible for supporting your bowels and bladder and controlling the sphincters that hold in poop and pee (hey, someone has to do it). Incontinence is a signal that these muscles lack strength and/or coordination.

Work 1:1 With A Physical Therapist

Your PT will help you restore strength to your pelvic floor, so leaks happen less often (or stop altogether). Treatment may include:

  • Techniques for connecting with your pelvic floor
  • Manual pelvic floor therapy
  • Strength & coordination exercises
  • Vaginal weights — yes, your vagina can lift weights

Power Up Your Pelvic Floor

On average, treatment takes 12 weekly visits, but you may notice results much sooner as you relearn how to effectively coordinate, contract, and release your pelvic floor.

Common & Treatable

Incontinence affects 1 in 3 women, and many don’t realize that it’s 100% treatable. Pelvic physical therapy is an effective treatment for both urinary and fecal incontinence.

"My bladder controls my life."
"I can’t run or do bootcamps anymore."
"I have to pack extra underwear."

Sources: Grodstein F, et al. Association of age, race, and obstetric history with urinary symptoms among women in the Nurses' Health Study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003; Dumoulin C, et al. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women. Braz J Phys Ther. 2019; Scott KM. Pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of fecal incontinence. Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2014.

Incontinence FAQs

What is incontinence?

Incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, gas, or stool, often associated with sneezing, laughing, exercise, or the inability to make it to the bathroom in time. Whether you completely pee your pants or just leak a few drops while laughing with a full bladder, any amount of leaking is considered incontinence.

What are the different types of incontinence?

Stress incontinence (SUI) or urge incontinence (UUI) are both involuntary losses of urine. In the case of SUI, this can occur with activity like coughing, sneezing, or jumping. UUI occurs when an urge to pee occurs and you leak before making it to the bathroom. If you experience both SUI and UUI , it is called mixed incontinence. Fecal incontinence is related to involuntary loss of stool.

What are the symptoms of incontinence?

Symptoms can range from leaking drops to complete bladder emptying. Once a person experiences incontinence, this can cause them to use the bathroom much more frequently in order to avoid future accidents. Over time this can lead to changes in your voiding strategies and habits that can further impact your quality of life.

What causes incontinence?

Incontinence can occur following events like surgery, weight gain or childbirth. While many factors can be involved, incontinence is most commonly related to pelvic floor dysfunction. It can be a coordination issue, meaning your body is unable to time a contraction correctly, or a strength issue, meaning you don't have the muscle ability to prevent or delay voiding.

Why is incontinence so common during pregnancy and postpartum?

In pregnancy, increased weight gain makes the ability to contract your pelvic floor muscles quickly or with adequate strength more challenging. At the same time, your growing baby puts pressure on your bladder, which increases your body's urge to pee. During a vaginal birth, the pelvic floor muscles can experience trauma that will increase incontinence postpartum.

How long does it take to stop incontinence?

Working with a physical therapist who specializes in treating the pelvic floor has been proven effective in reducing and curing incontinence. Those who attend regular physical therapy sessions can see results within weeks to months, depending on the cause, type and severity of their incontinence, as well as the person's individual goals, like return to running.

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The Origin Team

Our pelvic floor and orthopedic physical therapists have helped over 15,000 patients feel better in their bodies.
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Covered By Insurance

Taking care of yourself shouldn’t break the bank.

We’re in-network with most insurance plans.

Learn more here.

You might have pelvic floor dysfunction and not even know it.

Take our quiz to find out.